Why we need adversity? (Part 2)

Part One was posted on 18 July 2016.

We need adversity so that after we have overcome them, we would be in a better shape to cherish the now! Adversity in the present forces us to improve our conditions. We need adversity to tell us we have to do better and be better than who we are up until now. Adversity makes us stretch further. Not unlike when we do stretching, we purposely create tension while doing it. Stretching will never be complete without tension. Success will not be complete if there was no adversity to overcome. 

Adversity by itself is neutral. The moment you are born, you have a definite series of adversity lined up for you till the moment you die. Nobody alive is spared - royalties or beggars, socialites or working men - nobody! 

So, it is up to us how we interprets the adversities that come our way. If you treat them as good, as fuel to power you up to higher heights and greater greatness, you will deal with them more calmly and in a more accepting manner. That means you can focus more on dealing with it and as a result come out from the other side in the form of a better you, an improved and stronger version of yourself.

Just as there are good cholesterol (HDL) and bad cholesterol (LDL), good stress ('stress' on your heart when you do aerobic exercises like jogging or cycling)  and bad stress (being overly regretful of the past or overly worried about the future over which you have no control) there are good adversity and bad adversity.

Except that unlike cholesterol and stress, adversity can be good or bad depending on how you perceive it. This article is on the benefits of perceiving adversity favourably not in a sadistic sense of course. Perceive adversity 'favourably' in a prepared (and not in a helplessly pessimistic) sense so that when disaster strikes we can be ON right away!

 

Photo from the 620-km unnumbered municipal James Bay Highway between Matagami and Radisson in northern Quebec, Canada (Courtesy of Oscar from AA Roads Forum (www.aaroads.com), Topic:   Longest signed interval between gas stations.)

Photo from the 620-km unnumbered municipal James Bay Highway between Matagami and Radisson in northern Quebec, Canada (Courtesy of Oscar from AA Roads Forum (www.aaroads.com), Topic: Longest signed interval between gas stations.)