Live professionally...

We spend too much time trying to be a professional this or an expert in that but we forgot to be a professional human being. We spend too much time learning to be an expert in this or best student in that but we forgot to at least try to improve our art of learning. I think if we can just honestly focus on being a human being, the rest of our 'pursuits' will be more natural and more fulfilling regardless of the outcomes. What a person should be he/she must be. Forgot about competing with others. We only need to do our best.

The journey itself is the reward.

How to deal with our instant gratification mentality today? We have become more and more focused on instant gratification at the expense of delayed gratification. One way to deal with this is to see things a little differently. We jog so we can lose weight. In that sense, losing weight is the reward and our daily jog is part of our way to get there. Why not see the daily jog as the reward and nothing else? If we get and enjoy the reward everyday, at the end of 100 days we will have a lighter body whether we want it or not. Get your reward everyday so that the bigger 'reward' will eventually become inevitable.

Be more simple-minded. One reward at a time.

On great people and small things...

Most great people became great because they did small things with great care. Nothing is too small for them, that's why they became great. The person who does 'great' things from day one is one who has not been tested yet. Doesn't matter how old he is biologically.

PS: And if sometimes they (the great people) don't do certain things, it is not because they are too small. In fact, many great people don't like to attend many high-profile all-important functions but choose to stay home to do the 'small' things (like playing chess or eat dinner with their kids or whatever they find more meaning in doing).

Cross the threshold...

In the midst of noisy chaos, be quietly confident, resolutely competent and inwardly defiant. When surrounded by people who are ridiculously negative, be ridiculously positive. So positive that you don't need to reason with them, persuade them or influence them. Quietly work towards proving (to yourself not even to them) that they are wrong and you are right. And if these negative people include someone you care, muster enough resolve that one day you will bring your success into his/her living room so that it can be powerfully felt by them. Don't ever hope to change others without changing ourselves first. There is a threshold beyond which they will start paying attention to what you say, do and how you live and love. So the task before us is to cross that threshold.

The Art of Learning: An Inner Journey to Optimal Performance (by Josh Waitzkin)

This book is written by a world class chess player, world class Tai Chi Chuan Push Hand competitor and a black belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. The Art of Learning is about the author's method of learning. 

The Introduction section starts with a quote from Er Cheng Yishu, 11th century,

"One has to investigate the principle in one thing or one event exhaustively... Things and the self are governed by the same principle, If you understand one you understand the other, for the truth within and the truth without are identical."

The entire book is about how Josh developed his method incrementally and systematically over the years, a journey of discovery. He started off playing chess at the age of 6 and eventually became an eight-time National Chess Champion in his youth. Towards the end of his chess career, he became increasingly pressured to perform and realised that his love for chess was diminishing. 

Later, he picked up Tai Chi Chuan as a form of relaxation. But found it to be intriguing and on some levels it was very similar to chess. One day when he was at an exhibition match (where he had to play on 40 chess boards against 40 players simultaneously), he found a lot of similarities between chess and tai chi - both are about how to make the best use of space. In that exhibition chess event, he felt as if he was doing Tai Chi. And at times when he was doing Tai Chi Push Hand, he felt as if he was playing chess!

People said he was good at chess. Later, people said he was good at Tai Chi as well. He concluded that he was neither good at chess nor Tai Chi. What he was actually best at was the art of learning.

He talks about two theories of learning. One is the entirety theory of learning which most people subscribe to. For example, if a child plays piano wonderfully, we say he is gifted in piano.

The other theory is incremental theory of learning. According to this theory, if a child plays well, we say he/she must have practised and trained for many long and hard hours.

Here is my Standpoint A - Standpoint B Analysis...

Part 1:

The Standpoint A for this book is the Entirety theory of learning.

The Standpoint B for this book is the Incremental Theory of Learning.

Part 2:

Standpoint A: Many coaches try to mould their players into the ideal their coaches have envisioned for them. 

Standpoint B: Coaches should make the effort to understand the different personalities and styles of their students and then develop a learning approach and playing style that is uniquely crafted to suit that each unique student.

 

Truth doesn't have to be ugly or boring...

There are many definitions and explanations of what truth is. One of them I found on Google is "a fact or belief that is accepted as true." Am not here to debate if this definition is good enough or not. I think "truths" are events that reflect the pattern of law of nature. Hot air moves up. Cold air moves down. Treat people with respect and people will most likely to reciprocate.

Truths are supposed to be commonsensical to the extent that it can be boring most of the time - especially when they are being told by a parent/teacher to a child/student most of of the time.

I am writing this with  my parental/teacher's thinking hat on right now. The question before us is how can parents/teachers make their teachings (or sharing of truths) more interesting to their children/students? 

Truths doesn't have to be boring if we live it ourselves. The children/students will then be able to not only hear about them, but also get to see them in action and feel their presence as well. That's when truths becoming useful and helpful to them. Also, truths does not be presented to them as the absolute truths. Truths should also not appear to be taught/lectured to them. Just share it with them. Encourage them to think for themselves. Let them absorb what is useful and reflect on what they think at that time is rubbish and get them to explain why they think it is such.

This way, truths can perhaps be more easily communicated, talked about and thought over and contemplated on between both the speaker and the listener. A win-win situation can also thus be created.

 

 

 

On health and wealth...

If you want health, you need to pay attention to what you eat every day. If you want wealth, you need to pay attention to what you spend/invest your money on every day.

Good consistent eating habits lead us towards to better health. Good consistent money habits lead us toward better wealth. 

But always remember that without health, no amount of wealth is enough. In any case, most healthy people are already wealthy in the first place. Be thankful for that because not everyone is blessed with a good health to begin life with. 

I once watched an interview of a successful entrepreneur in Thailand, He wrote $1,000,000,000 on a piece of paper and explained that all the zeroes after the figure one represent economic wealth and that the number one represents one's health. If the 1 on the left is missing, all the zeroes that come after it has no monetary value whatsoever to that person at all!

"What a good analogy!", I thought.

 

When the push comes to shove...

Often times, we cannot choose what would happen to us in life. But we can choose to control all the things we can control to make sure we have the highest likelihood of the outcome we want. 

Often times, we cannot decide how much time we have in our lifetime to spend with our lived ones. But we can surely control how many happy moments we can have within the given time we spend with our loved ones.

By 'happy moments', I mean the moments when both of you (and your loved one/family/parents etc...) accept, appreciate and support each other and enjoying each other's company.

End of the day, when our loved ones would eventually leave us one day, or when we leave our loved ones behind, what matters to the person being left behind is not how much time you guys got to spend together but how many happy moments you guys have shared.

When the push comes to shove, it is the happy moments that count. 

To be very honest, whether we like it or not, or whether you like to hear this or not, we really have no control over how long we will live. That's why it is so important to make sure we invest happiness in whatever amount of time we have with out loved ones. So that when that inevitable day comes, there will be no regrets both for the departed or the survived.

Cherish your loved ones by investing in moments of happiness every second/minute/hour/day we have on this earth..

 

Be the yes man/woman who cares not what others think of him/her.

Usually, yes men have a very bad rep because they are people who cares too much about what others think of them if they say no. They are hypocritical at best and a coward-cum-hypocrite at worst!

But there is another type of 'yes men' for whom I have a very high regard. This type of yes men/women are men/women who has the courage and wisdom to say yes to life. They do not necessarily have to say yes to any particular person like their boss or their spouse. But they'd say yes to every possibility that life will bring them. They'd say yes to what most people would label as pleasant experiences. They'd also say yes to what most people would regard as unpleasant experiences, absolute failures or even tragic events. Come what may, they face life with no qualms. As such, they will have more energy than the rest of us to deal with whatever adversities and challenges that life will bring them, with zero energy exerted on being bitterness, upset, frustrated or regretful, but every ounce of energy of rectifying the problems they face at that particular moment.

The most formidable opponent is one who has every advantage to hurt us but one who is not afraid to face any consequences in the fight. The is not the man who can kill us that is most  dangerous. Rather, it is the man who isn't afraid at all to be killed at all - whether he has the upper hand or not. 

Be the yes man who says an unqualified yes to life come what may. Just being able to do that would itself be the reward - living life at its fullest.

Stay on course no matter what...

"Stay on course no matter what" says it all. What else is there to say about the key to success? Of course we all know the importance of staying on course no matter what. The problem however that most people struggle with is that they don't know that they should stay on course no matter what. The problem is what to do when we happen to steer off course? 

So, stay on course no matter what also means, whenever we steer off course, we must always steer back on course. "Staying on course" actually involves a lot of steering back on course over and over again until you arrive at your destination whereby you'll set a new destination and map out the path to get there. 

No matter how chaotic your day is, don't forget your goals and purpose in life.

Successful people are successful because they set their eyes on their goals no matter what. That does not necessarily mean their life is less chaotic than ours. It probably means they have some inner compass or navigating device of some sort that will guide them towards their goals no matter which direction that are facing at any given moment. No matter how stormy the weather is on the sea, the underwater world is always calm. 

Sometimes, or rather, more often than not, the people more successful than us is not any, smarter, more knowledgeable, more talented, faster, richer, nor luckier than us. It may well be only due to the fact that their efforts are more consistently and purposefully directed than ours. In other words, they have more grit and are systematic than most average people around.

 

 

 

 

Everyone wants a piece of the future now...

Visitors to this blog are mostly comprised of people who have made up their minds about leaving Malaysia for 'greener' pastures. Although outwardly, they look for more information for their research to help them make a more informed decision, inwardly, or maybe subconsciously also, they are actually expecting to find information that will help them reaffirm their conviction. In other words, only the information that are in line with their preconceived notions. They have more or less decidedly concluded that they should migrate elsewhere for the sake of their children's future. 

Of course, I set up this blog to be of service to readers who need more information. But at the end of the day, there is no substitute for first their hand experience. As much as I want my readers to take the information gathered and presented here seriously before they make the move, I know it is not possible.

Some experiences and insights can only  emerge after we have lived outside Malaysia for a certain number of years. Likewise, what I experienced two years into my life in Australia (ie. 2006) is very different from my experience in Australia up to 2017.

The best I can do here is to present all that I know to readers so that the information they will be reading is multifarious enough to help them make the most informed decision possible. Ultimately, they need to think for themselves or even go live in Australia or any other places for a while before deciding to burn their proverbial bridge or buy a one-way ticket - although the term 'one-way ticket' has become less relevant today considering how much our world has shrunk. 

Wherever you live, it is always good to adopt a global mindset. A friend told me, Australia is where he lives, but the world is where he works. Dr Marc Faber lives in Chiang Mai, Thailand but he can read the pulse of the world economy like the my GP reads mine. The idea is to never limit ourselves to one geographical corner.

Education (eg. our knowledge in technology, of the world and personal finance) is the great equalizer here - not the city we live in. Now is the time that matters. Make the most of now right here. Who really knows what the future will hold for Malaysia, Australia, Timbuktu or wherever? Timbuktu, by the way, is a real place which still exists today. In its prime, it was the city for top scholars worldwide.

We cannot change the past, just as we cannot foresee the future. The only thing we can do is to make the best of now. If we are in Malaysia, Malaysia is what we make of it. 

Success is how we define it. What success we will have in the future depends on how we think NOW and what we do NOW.

In that sense, Australia Good Meh is not so much about helping readers understand more about the migrant life in Australia but rather encouraging them to find, for themselves, their purpose in life. Myself included.

Whatever we do, whether it is migrating to a different country or deciding on which restaurant to have our dinner tonight, we are doing it in pursuit of our happiness. Hence, I hereby wish you and your loved ones a wonderful and happy 2017 ahead!

Oh by the way, everybody wants a piece of the future. But nobody wants to pay attention to the good things the present has to offer.

 

 

Timbuktu, Mali      

Timbuktu, Mali

 

 

Kuala Lumpur in the 1800s

Kuala Lumpur in the 1800s

Sydney, 1843

Sydney, 1843

A post by Amran Ariffin (A Malaysian who migrated to Perth 2 years ago)

This was posted by Amran Ariffin on his Facebook timeline on the first day of 2017. A frank and honest account of his experience living in Australia. With his knowledge, I share his post on my Timeline as well.

I wish he and his family all the happiness wherever in the world they are living.

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Amran Ariffin with Aimi Zulaikha Amran and 5 others.

· January 1 at 1:30am ·

The Latest Arrival: Looking back at my 24 months in Australia

In a land of immigrants, one was not an alien but simply the latest arrival - Rudolf Arnheim

First, a confession; I miss Malaysia every single day especially those mouth-watering flavorful fat-laden cholesterol-busting artery-clogging local food available from every corner of the street at any time of the day. Food here is generally tasteless and national dish is Fish and Chip, enough said!

We moved to Perth on 27 December 2014 with eyes wide open and no friend, family or job. The only thing we have is hope for better future for our three kids; Aimi, Nadya and Adam. I must say this was one of the most gut-wrenching decisions I had ever made in my life. It didn’t feel that way at all when I first put in my permanent residency application after the 2013 General Election. I didn’t even feel tinge of sadness when we broached this idea in late 2012. However, the actual move left us in turmoil. We were granted Permanent Residence status on 6 December 2013. I kept finding excuses not to move and keep convincing myself that there is nothing wrong with Malaysia. Even though the only reason we decided to leave is we couldn’t see the light at the end of the tunnel for Malaysia. UMNO is corrupted by power and sadly, it doesn’t take power to corrupt the fragmented opposition. I must give credit to my wife; Faz who actually made me sat and booked our one-way-ticket to Perth. This is the very first lesson you learn when you plan to emigrate or moving abroad, everyone in the family especially your better half must fully supported your plan or your migration is doomed before you even pack your bags.

The actual move is no less emotional or strenuous than the act of buying one way tickets to the place which will be our new home for unforeseeable future. Deciding what to bring and what to leave behind was not easy as it seemed. As a simple man, I hate clutter and decided to just bring only essential clothing and personal items. However, my definition of personal belongings is very much different from my wife’s. For women, everything is personal including dining table. So here a lot of compromise and cajoling took place. We finally agreed on the items to be shipped and I managed to keep it to minimum. It is very important at this stage to have mover with international experience, credential and presence in your destination port. Most people made mistakes by engaging the cheapest mover and saddled with a lot of problems claiming the belonging from custom because Australia has unbelievably strict custom and quarantine procedures in place. That is the second lesson to keep in mind for shipping your belonging abroad, don’t be penny wise and pound foolish. Choose your mover carefully.

The actual moving day is the most emotional of all. Up to this point, we were basically keeping our migration plan to really close family members and trusted friends. The reason was we don’t want to hear a lot of negativity or unwanted “noise” from people around us. It is so easy for anyone to open his/her big mouth just because talk is cheap and opinion is free. Even for average Malaysians who never live outside their Malaysia’s Tempurung, these people seems to know more about Australia than those who are actually frequent travelers there or at least study extensively about Australia preparing for migration. These people will want you to have second thought about your plan and doubt yourselves on your success. So it is very important for you to keep your migration plan to people that are supportive of your plan. Keep all the negatives thought away and keep all the negative people at bay. Saying goodbyes to your loved ones at the airport is not for the faint-hearted. You’ll have to keep it short and simple and keep reminding yourself why you are leaving in the first place.

We arrived in summer. The sky is bluer. The sun is brighter. The air is fresher. Less people, more trees. Less cars, more bicycles. Less buildings, more parks. Perth is quiet, in fact, very quiet.

The first six months here just feel like a breeze. Everything is new. Everything is weird. Everything is exciting. Even the simplest act like driving requires adjustment. Language, yes English is our second language but Australian slang is something else altogether. The kids’ school was totally new. New friends are exciting, multi-coloured and multi-cultured. New classrooms are so small that can only occupy maximum to 25 students and that is the only class for every level of age. Each class is handled by a single teacher who is teaching students all the subjects with the exception of Music and Physical Education. Students and teachers interact freely with each other. Class teacher understand our kids’ strengths and weaknesses by being with them all day long and throughout all subjects. So there is no labelling on kids. The teachers will just evaluate the students on his/her merit and not with some presumption. In Malaysia, with one teacher teaching one subject, students are judged on how good they are based on that subject. For example, my eldest Aimi is very good in Science subjects and she excels in it. However she dislikes numbers hence are not doing well in Mathematics and not paying attention in class during this subject. In Malaysia, she will be labelled as problem maker by her Math teacher. However, her class teacher was simply telling us that she is not interested in Math and we need to encourage her more to love this subject. In the extreme case scenario, the teacher will be telling the parents that their offspring should just concentrate on vocational/technical, music or sports because are not just academically-inclined. In Malaysia, everyone is judged on their exam results and parents define success as having straights As in their examinations. We are glad that we have the opportunity to remove our kids from that pressure cooker environment.

Another aspect that I need to touch when it comes to education system here is, behavioral development is being placed before academic development. Kids in Kindy (5 years) and Pre-Primary (6 years) are not expected to read and write. However, they are expected to build positive characters such as teamwork, courteous, polite, trustworthy and honest. Kids were taught to learn basic etiquette such as such as saying “good morning”, “thank you”, “please”, “welcome”, “how are you” at every available opportunity. They were taught not be afraid to ask question if they do not understand certain things. They were asked to pack away their toys after the play session finished. Talking about play, going to school here is equivalent to going to playground. Kids really enjoy going to school here. No pressure of trying to keep up with the mini Joneses. Everybody is doing thing at his/her own pace. No grade is given. No streaming of classes between good students and “bad” students. Teachers treat children with respect and not even once we heard any screaming or shouting coming from the classrooms. All in all, for our kids, moving to Australia is a breeze.

However, I can’t say the same thing for us, adults.

First, we struggle with employment or rather unemployment. We chose Perth for a very simple reason, mining boom. As a real estate agent, you want to be in the hot market and nothing is hotter than Perth in 2012 when we were doing our pre-migration research. Based on our simple research, all else is pointing towards Melbourne except for property market. However between 2012 when we did our research and 2015 when we actually settled down here, the situation couldn’t be any contrasting than Rosmah’s big hair and Wan Azizah’s flat tudung. The mining boom ends and Perth’s property market cools off substantially. For the first three months I decided to work for a residential property builder in Perth. The main reason is for me to understand the property market and the costs associated with building a residential property in Perth. If they were favorable, I would like to try my hand in a small scale property development. To my surprise and amazement, on average the builders in Perth are only making between 2-5% net profits. On the other hand, no developer in Malaysia will undertake any project for less than 20% profit. So, development is too risky for me. Next, I move to what I know best, selling properties. I managed to close deals here and there but the volume of closing is below my average. Maybe it is time to explore something new.

On the other hand, my wife couldn’t secure any job after two years here. Hundreds of resume were sent yet she didn’t even receive any reply for interview much less any job offer. We were perplexed with the lack of job opportunities here. However, after speaking to few newcomers here, our situation is far from unique. Most of the new migrants will be able to find any job within the first two years of moving here. Most end up taking menial odd jobs as cleaners, delivery person, waitress or general helper just to get by. The government essentially is not doing anything to address this issue. And it is puzzling to say the least when right wing politicians in their unabashed rhetoric are blaming migrants for taking away locals’ jobs. I mean, c’mon you can keep your low skilled job, we are not interested! With the general slowdown of economy due to the end of mining boom, the situation can only get worse in 2017. We believe new migrants need to have substantial saving to survive here and ultimately we have to create our own economy and jobs since no one is going to help you irregardless of your qualification and command of English which are better than some locals. The fact of the matter is, Perth is a very closed small economy based on “who-you-know” and “old-boy-club” for any job opportunity. If you feel nepotism and cronyism is bad in Malaysia, wait till you start looking for job in Perth. And the only reason I secure my job is because I work on commission only job. If not, I’ll end up in the same boat as my wife.

Another challenge here is relatively high cost of living in Perth compared to other capital cities in Australia. We were shocked to discover that Perth has the highest cost of living among the Australia’s capital cities. We have the most expensive coffee in Australia. The most expensive pint of beer (I’m glad Islam prohibits alcohol). The most expensive for eating out. The most expensive for simple pleasure like movie. Yesterday, we just spent AUD90 for a family of 5 to watch “Star Wars: Rogue One”. The most expensive for public transport and car ownership costs. And the list goes on and on. It came as a surprise because Perth is considered as the least developed capital and the nearest to Asia where all the cheap goodies came from. However, I was blinded by the fact that, Perth is the most isolated capital city in the world. Also the entire Western Australia despite being the largest state consists of only 2 million occupants, just slightly more than in South Australia which is mainly covered in forest and desert. These factors led all the main suppliers to send their exported goods to the Eastern States and then only the local distributors will send this to Perth via road. Even coffee which is mainly supplied by Indonesia took this longer route to Perth. This makes your wallet thin in no time in Perth.

Another negative aspect of Perth or Western Australia in general is, the people are very closed minded. We are making huge mistake in assuming that Whites generally are open minded and open to multi-culturalism like Americans even in the small town of Madison, Wisconsin where we studied from 1995 to 1997. No, not here. People are generally very conservative in their daily life and outlook. Newcomers are viewed with suspicion. One of my earlier memories was my landlady who are originally from Hungary warned us not to trust any Aussie. This is surprising for us considering she is also white and making Perth her home for the past 30 years. After living here for 24 months, we slowly understand what she was trying to warn us against. In general, people here not as warm or as embracing as Americans. They might give you a “good morning” here and there or their favorite, “how are you going?”. However there is no real warmness in their behavior toward us. As my ex-landlady warned me, they are very good at faking it. As a Muslim, we are also facing challenges from relentless right wing attack on Islam and general ignorance from public on our religion. My wife, who is wearing hijab feel uncomfortable whenever she is out. One more that one occasions, she received dirty look and unwarranted stares. We can only hope and pray that we can see beyond skin colors and hijab.

When we moved here two years ago, we are fully aware this is not going to be bed of roses. We still believe so. However, we sincerely believe good things will come to those who wait. Sooner or later we are going to break down all the barriers and move forward. Today as I watch the sunset of 2016 with friends and family, I can’t wait for the sun to rise again tomorrow. For tomorrow is going to be a new and better day for all of us.

2017 Here We Come and May The Force Be With Us!

Amran Ariffin
Bedford, Western Australia
December 31, 2016
9.54pm

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Comments:

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Amirah Alias Mohd It's a very long post. I shall reread it again. Btw, I ate a superlicious burger at Burger Lab on your behalf. Bahaha. Happy New Year!

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 1:41am

 

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Amran Ariffin This is supposed to be published somewhere but now I couldn't remember who asked me to write this hehehehe

Like · Reply · January 1 at 1:42am

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Juraime Musak best wishes in 2017 to u & family bro

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 1:43am

 

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Amran Ariffin Thanks bro!

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WArisan Hazrin Well said bro. I believed 2017 will be better for you. Hopefully for us as well.

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 1:49am

 

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Amran Ariffin Thanks bro!

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 2:17am

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Peter Ling Mate, you will make it. I failed once in 2001 before I made a second attempt in 2005. From there on, I never look back anymore

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 1:50am

 

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Amran Ariffin Thanks Pete

Like · Reply · January 1 at 2:06am

 

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Peter Ling Call me for a coffee anytime before 7/1/17 and let's have some meaningful sharing. I believe I will never regret what I did, so should you

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Peter Ling Perseverance is the anwser

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 1:51am

 

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Amran Ariffin Yup!

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Jahabar Sadiq All the best bro. Your books await you. And may your lives get better as the years go by.

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 1:53am

 

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Amran Ariffin Thanks boss. I need TMI back for this article to be published :) Happy new year bro!

Like · Reply · January 1 at 1:59am

 

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Jahabar Sadiq Hahahahahaha

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Zulie Zin

 

Found this..

 

Like · Reply · 3 · January 1 at 2:02am

 

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Amran Ariffin Thanks. That was the first article published in a book. Mana dapat buku? Hehe

Like · Reply · January 1 at 2:04am

 

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Amran Ariffin Yup. Cheers

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Dwen Muhammad Redzwan Very good summary bro..I'm sure it was never easy to make this move..good things certainly will come to those who wait and persevere..all the best and have a prosperous and rewarding New Year ahead for you and family! Cheers and kipidup mate!

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 2:03am

 

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Amran Ariffin Thanks mate!

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S. Jamal Al-Idrus All things considered, I believe you made the right decision. All the best, bro. But I'm sure you'll not only subsist, but prosper given time. Happy New Year and a better 2017 for you and your family 😎

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 2:03am

 

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Amran Ariffin Thanks bro. Warmest regards to UC.

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Previndran Singhe brother i wish i have the guts like you

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 2:04am

 

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Amran Ariffin Thanks bro!

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Previndran Singhe please send my best to ur missus and the family

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 2:06am

 

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Amran Ariffin Done!

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Joe Zain Aku mampu migrate ke langkawi je... wakakakaSee Translation

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 2:06am

 

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Amran Ariffin Hahaha! Kau dtg je sini sebulan dua heheheSee Translation

Like · Reply · January 1 at 2:18am

 

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Joe Zain Aku nak migrate ke Kashmir bela kambing bole.. hahahaSee Translation

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Mohamad Kamil Bin Nizam It may not be fair to judge the locals based on my stay in BNE for only 1 1/2 years but I do feel the same treatment as what u have experience. The first week after our arrival, I was confronted by a statement from a local car dealer that Asians came t...See More

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Amran Ariffin Thanks bro & thanks for introducing good people like Nasir Embee to me.

Like · Reply · January 1 at 2:12am

 

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Mohamad Kamil Bin Nizam No worries bro. After all that is the least I could do for my former roommate :-)

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Ng Seksan it is a privilege to share some food n the sunset with u today Amran Ariffin

may 2017 be fill with opportunities, health n fulfillment for u your lovely family

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 2:12am

 

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Amran Ariffin We share more than that, didn't we? Hahaha! Cu tomorrow for the great send off!!!

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 2:13am

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Mohamad Sazali Samjis All the best bro !!!

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 2:23am

 

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Azmil Tayeb Nice write up, bro! Yup, I can totally relate with the experience of racism and xenophobia. Canberra is an isolated kampung as well though not as ceruk as Perth. Happy New Year to you, Faz and the kids. Lemme know when you're back in Msia, esp Penang. Or maybe I'll visit you in Perth one of these days and we ride around town on your Brommie.

Like · Reply · 2 · January 1 at 2:38am

 

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Amran Ariffin Thanks bro. Anytime bro anytime! Happy new year bro!

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 2:42am · Edited

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Lavin RY Best wishes for 2017 Amran Ariffin. Your post was very robust and hope all your wishes and aspirations for you and your family come through. Cheers

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 2:41am

 

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Amran Ariffin Thanks bro. How's your campaign shaping up?

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 2:42am

 

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Lavin RY Its coming along well. Time is flying

Like · Reply · January 1 at 3:23am

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Badh Asfaani 👍👍👍

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 2:50am

 

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Chuen Ooi Happy New Year, Bro & Your Family!

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 2:50am

 

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Amran Ariffin Thanks boss! Same to you & loved ones: ps: Keep your "thing" intact heheheh

Like · Reply · January 1 at 2:52am · Edited

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Izan Tahir Happy new year dear Amran.

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 3:10am

 

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Amran Ariffin Thanks Izan Tahir. Looking forward to our Butter Chicken date soon :)

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 9:31am

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Yee Weng Chiang happy new year to you and family...;)

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 3:26am

 

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Amran Ariffin Thanks

Like · Reply · January 1 at 9:31am

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Cbd Adrian Wang Bro, wish you have a fruitful year in 2017.

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 3:49am

 

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Amran Ariffin Thanks

Like · Reply · January 1 at 9:31am

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Mashruddin Nawawi Panjangnya tapi menarik!See Translation

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 3:53am

 

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Amran Ariffin

Translated from Malay

KindergartenSee Original

Like · Reply · January 1 at 9:32am

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Terry Wong Stay strong & persevere, bro. We, as parents will always sacrifice for our kid's future. Best wishes to you and your family. May 2017 be a better year for all of you. Happy New Year.

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 3:54am

 

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Amran Ariffin Bro. Happy new year!

Like · Reply · January 1 at 9:32am

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Julie Mohamed Very well written mere!

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 4:30am

 

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Amran Ariffin

Translated from Malay

KindergartenSee Original

Like · Reply · January 1 at 9:32am

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Elis S. Mokhtar Happy new year to you and your family.. your story is the biggest inspiration 💪💪💪💪

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 4:48am

 

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Amran Ariffin Thanks. Bigger than Bunga Telur? Hehehe.

Like · Reply · January 1 at 9:32am

 

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Elis S. Mokhtar Hahahhaha of course.. termasuk sekali bunga telur hahahha.. another 23 mins to new year from Netherlands 😂😂😂See Translation

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 9:37am

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Ken Soong Wish you well and a happy new year my friend!

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 5:23am

 

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Amran Ariffin Thanks

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Jenny Roszaini Razek Yan Amran Ariffin Kak jenny doa 2017 will be better for you. Insya Allah. A guy like u with a supportive wife like Faz, success will be with you sooner. Amiin.

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 5:40am

 

Amran Ariffin replied · 1 Reply

 

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Leong Sook Ping Happy new year Amran. Wish you and family a very Happy n fruitful year ahead. Totally get the story u hv written n the sacrifices u hv made for d better future of yr family. Persevere kawan. U can do it.

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 6:11am

 

Amran Ariffin replied · 1 Reply

 

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Hussein Abdul Hamid Good write up....pinjam for my blog to share with others...but I will probably break it up into sections and post it over a period of time as it is too long for many to read at one go..tqs.

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 7:11am

 

Amran Ariffin replied · 1 Reply

 

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Calvin Teh A well written of the reality life in Australia... there is no perfect place in this world, as long as you enjoy every wonderful day in this world, who cares which country you are residing except Malaysia

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 8:18am

 

Ken Soong replied · 1 Reply

 

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Adelina Iskandar Thanks for sharing this. Hugs and kisses to everyone. Salam kat Faz. And i do like yr dining table in Perth 💚💛

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 8:52am

 

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Es Tung I'm glad i have known you Amran Ariffin. It gives me this little hope that there are still nice people out there who can think beyond creed and skin colour. Only regret is that the country had lost a fine son of the soil who can help make this nation great again.

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 9:04am

 

Amran Ariffin replied · 1 Reply

 

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Aries Iskandar Muhammed terbaik la boh...tp flat white tetap dop sedak...hahahaSee Translation

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 9:26am

 

Aries Iskandar Muhammed replied · 2 Replies

 

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Farhad Omar Keep focused and maintain your bearings. Australian cities are made up of migrants and thus the constituents tend to be mistrusting at first. On the other hand if you travel beyond the city borders and meet others they tend to be warmer and friendlier. The farming and pastoral folk are warm and accepting. Australia has lots to offer.

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 9:36am

 

Farhad Omar replied · 4 Replies

 

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Amran Ariffin Thanks for your warm replies. Pls share far & wide. Cheers!

Like · Reply · January 1 at 9:58am

 

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Nasir Embee Bro Amran Ariffin, your story pretty much the same like us. Your words like "if the other half do not give full support and encouragement, things wouldn't just happened" is so true....

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 10:02am

 

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Nasharuddin Zainal All the best bro. Gambatte kudasaiSee Translation

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 10:06am

 

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Zaim Durulaman Selamat tahun baru dan selamat berusahaSee Translation

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 10:13am

 

Amran Ariffin replied · 1 Reply

 

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Tengku Mohd Adzhair penulis novel rupenye... x sker !See Translation

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 10:18am

 

Tengku Mohd Adzhair replied · 2 Replies

 

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Zafuan Yazoo Yahaya Be strong and persevere Bro. You're doing right

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 10:22am

 

Amran Ariffin replied · 1 Reply

 

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Kenny Teng Selamat Tahun Baru, semoga sejahtera selalu.... penulisan yang menarik dibaca. ( selalunya saya jarang baca cerita panjang panjang kat FB) ha ha.See Translation

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 10:39am

 

Amran Ariffin replied · 3 Replies

 

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Hasnah Jalaludin Well written, my brother! An eye-opener indeed..In Shaa Allah, we'll come and visit one day..

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 11:01am

 

Hasnah Jalaludin replied · 2 Replies

 

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Peter Ling When I first came to this country, racism was at it worst. Things have changed heaps - it has changed for the better. Unlike Malaysia. It takes time to adjust. Have faith, my friends, Australians are more open minded and this is where our future is

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 11:20am

 

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Nor Azila Epy new year to all of you... Hugs & kisses to kids😘... Life will always be better for sure....

Like · Reply · 2 · January 1 at 11:25am

 

Fazilah Jamal replied · 1 Reply

 

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Rahman Abdullah Stay!!! Don't go back!

Like · Reply · 2 · January 1 at 11:41am

 

Amran Ariffin replied · 3 Replies

 

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Amran Ariffin Akmal Eirfan Apa khabar? Happy New Year bro!See Translation

Like · Reply · January 1 at 11:46am

 

Akmal Eirfan replied · 1 Reply

 

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Azmil Farid Zabir You will feel more at home once you talk (or try to sound like),walk, play, eat, god forbid pray like the locals. Assimilation bro. Once you assimilate you become "native".

Some of our chinese brethens wouldnt do that back at home (eg cannot speak the...See More

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 12:18pm

 

Ken Soong replied · 4 Replies

 

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Md Adam Md Akil Comprehensive summary and very interesting story. Tq for sharing the experience. 😊

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 12:24pm

 

Amran Ariffin replied · 3 Replies

 

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Fadzil Amin Byk points yg sgt menarik. Walaupun aku byk juga tak paham tapi keseluruhannya amat menarik. Bab education tu lebih menarik. Tq bro. Boleh buat buku ni. Harap tuan haji Amran Ariffin tabah!See Translation

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 12:53pm

 

Amran Ariffin replied · 1 Reply

 

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Sumarlina Andriati semoga dimurahkan & dipermudahkan rezeki sllu utk 2017 dan juga thn2 hari2 yg dtg... aameen... take care faz, amran, aimi, nadya & adam. tq.See Translation

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 1:01pm

 

Amran Ariffin replied · 1 Reply

 

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Shyful Azizi Abdul Rahman Thankx bro.. article menarik.. seriously, u really can write..

Like · Reply · 2 · January 1 at 1:17pm

 

Amran Ariffin replied · 1 Reply

 

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Asrul Hadi Selamat tahun baru abg yang... Semoga Allah s.w.t senantiasa memberikan yang terbaik utk abg yang sekeluarga... 2017 pasti lebih baik insyaaAllah..See Translation

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 1:46pm · Edited

 

Asrul Hadi replied · 2 Replies

 

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Liza FS Happy New Year guys! A good write up indeed. May this year bring more barakah for us all 😊

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 2:04pm

 

Amran Ariffin replied · 1 Reply

 

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Siti Hajar Abdullah I'll continue my reading..too long
Just half of your writing..but.....See More

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 2:27pm

 

Amran Ariffin replied · 3 Replies

 

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Gerard Kho Well done on booking that 1 way ticket!

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 2:34pm

 

Amran Ariffin replied · 1 Reply

 

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Choi Kok Yew A good book. I really enjoyed it tq

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 2:45pm

 

Amran Ariffin replied · 1 Reply

 

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Ariff Sukimin Well written Amran Ariffin. You are a very strong and determined person. Sy doakan Allah beri kekuatan pada tuan sekeluarga di Perth. Amin.See Translation

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 2:52pm

 

Amran Ariffin replied · 1 Reply

 

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Fahrezal Ghazali Happy New Year to you and family! Still remember hosting you all before departure. Perservere, dear friend. Insya Allah, thing will get better as time goes by.

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 3:03pm

 

Amran Ariffin replied · 1 Reply

 

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Abdul Samad Ahmad Assalamualaikum. Farhad Omar our mutual FB friend. Not sure if we had bumped into each other here...very interesting write up. We arrived here Apr2013 and have had similar experiences and findings...cant add much or offer encouragement macam orang lama...See More

Like · Reply · 2 · January 1 at 4:33pm

 

Amran Ariffin replied · 1 Reply

 

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Susan Lowe brilliant! well said Amran! Best wishes to you and your family.(P.S. I think we are nicer, over here!) SILNZ!

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 4:49pm

 

Amran Ariffin replied · 1 Reply

 

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Anis H. Hassan Great write up bro. Happy New Year to you & family. Hope things will turn out better this year.

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 6:00pm

 

Amran Ariffin replied · 1 Reply

 

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Shahrir Mohd Salleh May 2017 be prosperous to us all....Happy New Year Mere n Faz....

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 7:41pm

 

Shahrir Mohd Salleh replied · 5 Replies

 

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Lann Mohamad Semoga 2017 menjadi tahun yg lebih gemilang utk abe Amran AriffinSee Translation

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 10:15pm

 

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Wan Hamka Wan Shamsudin Mohon izin utk share. Tq.See Translation

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 11:21pm

 

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Muhd Jauhar Azmi Moga dimudahkan ursan i. AllahSee Translation

Like · Reply · 1 · January 1 at 11:48pm

 

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Mohd Shukran Ismail May 2017 brings better days Bro

Like · Reply · 1 · January 2 at 4:45am

 

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Mohamad Shahrir Ali Juraime Musak Aries Iskandar Muhammed Haidar Toha... Kalau mcm ni, jom migrate ke Las Vegas je lah... Kensel perth..See Translation

Like · Reply · 2 · January 2 at 12:51pm

 

Juraime Musak replied · 2 Replies

 

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Ken Soong i wonder how much better will our kids be growing up in australia rather than in malaysia. yes, malaysian teachers may seem a little too harsh or judgmental or critical towards the kids. but in the west they have gone to the other extreme, esp in the a...See More

Like · Reply · 2 · January 2 at 7:38pm · Edited

 

Ken Soong replied · 2 Replies

 

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Tze-Kirk Lee Hv always enjoyed reading your reflections! There's always a push-pull factor wherever we go...most importantly is dat u r making the very best of it!!
Ps: Cikgu Inggeris kat SAS tentu bangga dgn mu! :)

Unlike · Reply · 3 · January 2 at 6:04pm

 

Amran Ariffin replied · 1 Reply

 

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Ken Soong hey thanks, haha... Saya budak yang selalu ponteng tu lah. Samadian also yeah?

Like · Reply · 1 · January 2 at 6:17pm

 

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Ken Soong okok you were writing to Amran. Get t! hahaha...

Like · Reply · 2 · January 2 at 6:39pm

 

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Aida Othman Amazing journey!!!

Like · Reply · 1 · January 2 at 9:47pm

 

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Pearly Teo Quite true coz before u go migrating, do all yr homework, remember nothing is free, they dont recognise yr certs or degrees only if ur australian grads so looking for a job b4 going is useless better studying again n get aussie certs instead. Then u mi...See More

Like · Reply · 1 · January 3 at 10:57am

 

Amran Ariffin replied · 3 Replies

 

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Syaliza Omar Statement made by Pearly is totally true. I have been living in NZ for 4.5 years, studying and working with them, and what I can say is all those greetings and smile which make most Malaysians puzzling 'wow' because we dont practice that in Malaysia is...See More

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Izuhan Rahimi Klass..Mere nih..

Like · Reply · 1 · January 4 at 4:23pm

 

 

 

 

Next Step vs Next Rep

Everyone focus on what their next step, next big plan, next big project, next level should be. Not many are willing to think about their next rep.
How to improve it further, how to have a system of generating better reps in the future.

Next rep is about the basics, the foundation, the seemingly trivial, simple uninteresting stuff but is in fact the only thing that really matters more than anything else that comes after it.

I think truly effective people get excited over less exciting stuff like next rep. Less effective people people get bored with next rep and focus too much on next rep because it excites them so much more!

Coming up with realisation such as described in these words and then writing them out here is enjoyable and definitely more exciting than living them out in our daily practice. Yet it is the living it out that makes the real difference, not just the writing and the reading parts. Good start but does not guarantee equally good results.

Sometimes, the only way to get to the next step is through a series of next reps!

 

A life-changing book, anyone?

There is no shortage of very good books that can change our lives. I have read many of them too. Yet how come my life hasn't changed much? Or at least not as much as I would have wished? That's because I have not really read one book really deeply and repetitively until I try out every strategy or important point mentioned in the book. If I do that with just one book, I know my life will change for the better. I guess reading one good book with 100% commitment is harder than reading 100 good books without holding myself accountable to do the things espoused in those books.